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Water Boundary Tool



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California Environmental Health Tracking Program

850 Marina Bay Pkwy, P-3
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(510) 620-3038
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Last Edited: 3/8/2013

Instructions and Tutorials

Below are tutorials with instructions for using the Water Boundary Tool.  We are currently developing the tutorials, so items without links are in progress and will be completed soon.

See How This Works for a big picture overview on how to enter a boundary into the system.  Begin using the water tool now.

 


Registration

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Getting started editing

This tutorial video assumes you have already registered and signed-in.  It will show you how to access the Service Area Editor, create a new service area file and manipulate points (including creating, moving, and deleting).  It will also show you how to do some more advanced refining of sections of your service area polygons, including running a section along the centerline of streets or adjusting a section to match property boundaries.

 

 

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How to prepare a table of addresses

You can create or edit a boundary by uploading a table of addresses, which the water boundary tool will geocode and then convert into a polygon.  Below are some guidelines for preparing a table for uploading. 

  • Uploaded files should be named with alphanumeric characters (not starting with a number), no spaces, and no punctuation characters
  • Your data should have four fields: unique ID for each record, street address (street number, name, prefix, direction, suffix), city, and zip code
  • Make sure to include column names for the four fields in the first row of the table. The column names must be A-Z with no numbers, spaces, or punctuation characters.
  • Make sure street names are spelled out (for example, “Martin Luther King Blvd,” not “MLK Blvd”)
  • Make sure that the unique ID field does not have blank or repeating values. Unique IDs are the single biggest problem users have in beginning a batch process.  If there is a problem with the unique ID field, you will see a message saying "error adding primary key to table...".
  • If you are importing an Excel (.xls or .xlsx) file, please remove any extra header rows such that the column names are in the first row and the address data starts in the second row.  Please also ensure that only one worksheet is in the workbook and that worksheet contains the address data.
  • If you are importing an Access (.mdb or .accdb) database, please ensure that only one table is included in the database and that table contains the address data.

Below is an example table (make sure to include the column names in the first row of your table):

ID ADDRESS CITY ZIP
0001 5565 CARPINTERIA AV CARPINTERIA 93013-0000
0006 12134 VICTORY BL N HOLLYWOOD 91606-3205
0011 999 NORTH TUSTIN AVENUE SANTA ANA 92705-6505
0016 1490 6TH ST COACHELLA 92236
0021 11733 STATE HIGHWAY 160 COURTLAND 95615
0026 3521 WHITTIER BLVD LOS ANGELES 90023
0031 143 N CLARK STREET FRESNO 93701
0036 3022 INTERNATIONAL BL OAKLAND 94601-2226
0041 520 W 17TH STREET SANTA ANA 92706-3614
0046 1429 COLUSA HIGHWAY YUBA CITY 95993
0051 5196 HILL RD E LAKEPORT 95453
0056 4050 BARRANCA PARKWAY IRVINE 92604-1723
0061 2593 S KING ROAD SAN JOSE 95122-1880
0066 5339 N FRESNO ST FRESNO 93710
0071 1441 LIBERTY ST REDDING 96001
0076 11720 EDUCATION ST AUBURN 95602
0081 415 N SYCAMORE STREET SANTA ANA 92701

 

Special Note: If your dataset includes other fields, for example confidential identifiers, you are expected to practice safe information security and delete these fields prior to using the geocoding service. After using the geocoding service, you can join or merge these fields back into your geocoded address table in your local environment using the unique ID field.

 

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How to prepare a table of coordinates

You can create or edit a boundary by uploading a table of coordinates, which the water boundary tool will convert into a polygon.  Below are some guidelines for preparing a table for uploading.

  • The table must have a column named "x" or "longitude"
  • The table must have a column named "y" or "latitude"
  • Coordinate values must be stored as NAD83 decimal degrees
  • Coordinate values in California range from approximately (-124, 42) in the northwest to (-114, 32) in the southeast
  • Uploaded files should be named with alphanumeric characters (not starting with a number), no spaces, and no punctuation characters

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How to prepare a compressed/zipped shapefile

You can create or edit a boundary by uploading a compressed/zipped shapefile.  For use by the water tool, the compressed/zipped shapefile must minimally be comprised of the following four component files: 

  • Shapefile shape format (.shp)
  • Shapefile shape index format (.shx)
  • Shapefile attribute format (.dbf)
  • Shapefile projection format (.prj)

Your shapefile can include any number of records that have POLYGON or MULTIPOLYGON shapes.  LINE, MULTILINE, POINT, MULTIPOINT and LINESTRING shapes are ignored by the Water Boundary Tool.  Once all of the shape records are displayed on the map, you can associate all of the records with the currently edited service area file or you can select one or more shapes to filter the records that are imported into the service area file.

Click here for more information about shapefiles.  To zip/compress a set of files, see the following instructions: Windows or Mac.  The uploaded compressed/zip file, as well as the component compressed files, should be named with alphanumeric characters (not starting with a number), no spaces, and no punctuation characters.  Users have also reported that you should avoid placing the shapefile's component files in sub-folders of the zip file.

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How to prepare a KML file

You can create or edit a boundary by uploading a KML file.  Below are some guidelines for preparing the KML file:

  • The uploaded KML file should be named with alphanumeric characters (not starting with a number), no spaces, no punctuation characters, and ending in the extension ".kml" (e.g. MyWaterDistrict.kml)
  • The KML file must contain at least one element and, within that, at least one element.  If the KML file is lacking any elements, the Water Boundary Tool will report an error.  The Pentagon polygon at Google's KML Tutorial page is a good example of a KML file supported by the Water Boundary Tool.
  • Multiple elements are supported, if they are contained within a element.
  • and elements are ignored
  • Holes within elements are supported by using the element.

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How to upload a compressed/zipped shapefile

 

 

 

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How to upload a KML file

 

 

 

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How to add boundaries for multiple water systems from one shapefile

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How to define a service area boundary from individual properties (visually or by Assessor Parcel Number)

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How to add new areas to an existing service area file

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How to edit a boundary that has been marked as "complete"

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How to specify the "Valid From" and "Valid To" dates

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