California Department of Public Health logo: three likenesses of people colored blue, green, and orange  
Sign-In  
Last Edited: 7/29/2010

Study endpoints, goals, and prioritization for a program in hazardous chemical epidemiology
Written: 03/01/88


Much of traditional environmental epidemiology dealt with subtle physiological effects resulting from some ubiquitous imperceptible pollutant.  There was no local pressure to conduct specific studies, and epidemiologists obtained grants to study what they wanted, without much input from the communities being studied.  Now, however, public agencies with epidemiology sections find themselves swamped with demands from community groups to study clusters of disease or to study groups of people who have had an unusual exposure.  How are we to understand the origin of this new situation?  Should the affected public agencies have a different set of priorities from those of the environmental research institutes and the universities?

Suggested Citation

  • Neutra R, Goldman L, Smith D, Satin K, Deane M. Study endpoints, goals, and prioritization for a program in hazardous chemical epidemiology. Archives of Environmental Health 1988; 43(2):94-99.